June 2nd, Future Now: Stephany Bravo, Marcus Clayton, & Tony Morales

Hosted by Dryland LA literary journal’s Nikolai Garcia, join us via Zoom and live at Re/Arte Centro Literario in Boyle Heights to hear featured poets, writers, and guest Open Mic artists present their work every first Thursday of the month.

In this event we call on all Black & Brown poets and writers to join us for our Open Mic & Reading Series, which features three authors published in Dryland LA Issue 11. This month’s features include Stephany Bravo, winner of the HYPHENS Essay Prize, Marcus Clayton, Executive Editor for Indicia Literary Journal, and June Jordan’s Poetry for the People poet, Tony Morales.

Zoom ID: 878 8950 0444

Address: 2123 E Cesar Chavez. Ave. Boyle Heights, CA.

Fill out this google form to sign up for the Open Mic. 10 Slots available per reading!

Date: Thursday, June 2nd

Time: 7 pm – 9 pm PDT.

About the authors

Stephany Bravo was born in Los Angeles and raised in Compton, CA. to parents of Mexican descent. Stephany is a dual doctoral candidate of English and Chicano/Latino Studies at Michigan State University where she processes community-based archives and crafts testimonios. Stephany’s writing appears in Boundless: The Anthology of the Rio Grande ValleyDryland: A Literary Journal Born in South Central Los Angeles and Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy. Her piece, “¡Tamales, Tamales, Tamaleees!” won the HYPHENS Essay Prize.

Marcus Clayton is a multigenre Afro-Latino writer from South Gate, CA, who holds an M.F.A. in Poetry from the California State University of Long Beach. He is an executive editor for Indicia Literary Journal, and plays in a punk band called tudors. Currently, he pursues a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California, focusing his studies on the intersections between Latinx literature, Black literature, Decolonization, and Punk Rock. Some published work can be seen or is forthcoming in Nightboat Books, The Oxford Handbook of Punk Rock, Indiana Review, Passages North, Joyland Magazine, and Glass Poetry Press among many others.

Tony Morales (he/him) is a multimedia artist from Los Angeles. He participated in June Jordan’s Poetry for the People as a student and student teacher poet. 

Open Mic Guidelines

  • Be ready to unmute yourself when your name is called and please mute yourself again once you are done sharing. 
  • Open-mic readers will have three minutes to share. Please be respectful of our other readers’ time. We will use the mute button at our discretion. 
  • We will not tolerate any hate speech. (No racism, sexism, homophobia, etc). 

Help us get the word out by sharing the flyer on Instagram, FB, or Twitter and invite a friend to come hang out! This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to showcase their poetry and connect with artists of the Los Angeles community and beyond.

May 5th, Future Now: Victoria Martínez Andrade, Moncho Alvarado, & Alicia Viguer-Espert

Hosted by Dryland LA literary journal’s Nikolai Garcia, join us via Zoom and live at Re/Arte Centro Literario in Boyle Heights to hear featured poets and guest Open Mic artists present their work, every first Thursday of the month.

In this event we call on all Black & Brown poets and writers to join us for our Open Mic & Reading Series, which features three authors published in literary journal Dryland LA. This month features include poets published in Issue 11: From Ciudad de México, Victoria Martínez Andrade; Moncho Alvarado, who just released her debut poetry collection Greyhound Americans (winner of the 2020 Saturnalia Book Prize); and Alicia Viguer-Espert, two-time pushcart prize nominee.

Zoom ID: 878 8950 0444

Address: 2123 Cesar Chavez. Ave. Boyle Heights, CA.

Fill out this google form to sign up for the Open Mic. 10 Slots available per reading!

Date: Thursday, May 5th

Time: 7 pm – 9 pm PDT.

About the authors

Victoria Martinez is from Mexico City, where she currently lives. Storyteller, poet, author of Emociones Clandestinas (2000) presented at FIL in Guadalajara. She has worked into advertising and digital communication and likes to write about all forms of dance and corporal movement, about love, time and death, and details of life that together describe historical moments of contemporary history.

Moncho Alvarado is a sister in residence in air, a Cihuayollotl trans woman Xicanx poet, translator, visual artist, and educator. She is the author of Greyhound Americans (Saturnalia Books 2022), which was the winner of the 2020 Saturnalia Book Prize, selected by Diane Seuss. She has been published in Meridian, Foglifter, Lunch Ticket, 2018 Emerge Lambda Fellows Anthology, Poets.org, and other publications. She is a recipient of fellowships and residencies from The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation, Lambda Literary, Poets House, Troika House, the Summer Seminar at Sarah Lawrence College, and won the Academy of American Poet’s John B. Santoianni award for excellence in poetry. She lives part time in Pacoima, CA and Queens, NY. follow her at monchoalvarado.com

Born in Valencia, Spain, Alicia Viguer-Espert was raised in a bilingual household of Castilian and Valencian, travelled the world, learned English as an adult, began writing in English in 2017 and that same year was the winner of the 2017 San Gabriel Valley Poetry Festival Book. She writes about her relationship to nature, identity, language, home, and soul while dreaming to elicit hope with her poetry. Her work has been published in national and international journals, anthologies, magazines, and web sites. Featured poet at numerous museums, art galleries, libraries, and poetry salons, Alicia is also a twice Pushcart nominee. 


Open Mic Guidelines

  • Be ready to unmute yourself when your name is called and please mute yourself again once you are done sharing. 
  • Open-mic readers will have three minutes to share. Please be respectful of our other readers’ time. We will use the mute button at our discretion. 
  • We will not tolerate any hate speech. (No racism, sexism, homophobia, etc). 

Help us get the word out by sharing the flyer on Instagram, FB, or Twitter and invite a friend to come hang out! This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to showcase their poetry and connect with artists of the Los Angeles community and beyond.

Dryland in San Francisco April 30th – Future Now Featuring Josiah Luis Alderete, Tongo Eisen-Martin & More

Join us this Saturday, April 30th, for a special edition of our monthly Reading & Open Mic Series, Future Now, live from the Medicine For Nightmares Bookstore & Gallery in the San Francisco Mission District. This month we are featuring contributors from Issue 11 and Bay Area poets: Josiah Luis Alderete, hector son of hector, Lupita Limón Corrales, Tongo Eisen-Martin, Mimi Tempestt, & Adrian Ibarra.

Hosted by Dryland Editor-in-Chief Viva Padilla & Assistant Editor Nikolai Garcia. Come meet them in person!

This is a hybrid event and will be both in-person and accesible online via zoom.

When: Saturday, April 30th 8-10PM PST

In-Person Location: MEDICINE FOR NIGHTMARES 3036 24th St San Francisco CA 94110

ZOOM LINK

Fill out this google form to sign up for the Open Mic. Whether you’re attending on-site or via zoom you’ll get a chance to share your poems. Only 10 spots available!

Open Mic Guidelines:

  • Be ready to unmute yourself when your name is called and please mute yourself again once you are done sharing. 
  • Open-mic readers will have three minutes to share. Please be respectful of our other readers’ time. We will use the mute button at our discretion. 
  • We will not tolerate any hate speech. (No racism, sexism, homophobia, etc). 

Help us get the word out by sharing the flyer on Instagram, FB, or Twitter and invite a friend to come hang out! This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to showcase their poetry and connect with artists of the Los Angeles & Bay Area communities.


ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Josiah Luis Alderete is a full blooded Pocho who first learned how to write poesia in the kitchen of his Mama’s Mexican restaurant. He was a founding member of the outspoken word group, “The Molotov Mouths,” and is the curator and host of the long running monthly Chicano/Latinx reading series, “Speaking Axolotl.” He is one of the recipients of the 2021 San Francisco Foundation/Nomadic Press Literary Award. Josiah’s first book of poems, Baby Axolotls y Old Pochos, was released in 2021 from Black Freighter Press.

hector son of hector lives in Oakland, CA. He is the child of Mexican immigrants, currently works in a hospital, dreams of short stories, and writes poetry in secret.

Lupita Limón Corrales is an undocumented angel, archivist, and daughter.

Tongo Eisen-Martin is a poet, movement worker, and educator originally from San Francisco. His latest curriculum on extrajudicial killing of Black people, “We Charge Genocide Again,” has been used as an educational and organizing tool nation-
wide. His book, Someone’s Dead Already, was nominated for a California Book Award. His latest book, Heaven Is All Goodbyes, (City Lights Pocket Poets series) was shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize and won both a California and American Book Award.

Mimi Tempestt (she/they) is a multidisciplinary artist, poet, and daughter of California. She has a MA in Literature from Mills College, and is currently a doctoral student in the Creative/Critical PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz. Her debut collection of poems, the monumental misrememberings, is published with Co-Conspirator Press (2020). She was choosen for participation in the Lambda Literary Writers Retreat For Emerging LGBTQ Voices for poetry in 2021, and is currently a creative fellow at The Ruby in San Francisco. Her Works can be found in Foglifter, Apogee Journal, Interim Poetics, and The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Adrian Ibarra is a poet and weirdo living in Oakland, CA. He is an MFA grad from Antioch University, Los Angeles where he served as managing editor for their literary magazine, Lunch Ticket. His work has been nominated for the Best of the Net and has appeared at The John Lion New Plays Festival, in Burningword, The Wild Word, Cinepunx, Metaphor Magazine, and Barren Magazine, as well as other journals and lit mags that don’t exist anymore. Works in progress can be found at teenknifecrime.tumblr.com.

5 Questions for 2022 California Gubernatorial Candidate Luis J. Rodriguez

We need to reset everything. From being a state that pollutes and excavates or drills for the profit of a few, to a state that is based on the shared well-being of everyone.

Luis J. Rodriguez, Candidate for California Governor 2022

Matt Sedillo: Hello Luis! Thank you for being here. Let’s get right to it! This is the second time that you are running for Governor with endorsements of several political parties. The first question is why did you seek out multiple endorsements and what in particular about your political vision has inspired this rarely seen unity around your campaign?  

Luis J. Rodriguez: The California Green Party and the state’s Peace & Freedom Party came to me last November about a “Left Unity Slate” that would include endorsing me for California governor and other candidates for state offices. I agreed because we cannot turn over the electoral arena to corporate interests, whether in the Democrats or Republicans. The radical visions and answers to address poverty, homelessness, mass incarceration, deadly police practices, climate change, healthcare, education, and immigrant rights must blossom and take root. Governor Newsom in recent polls is losing ground among progressives, youth, as well as Black and brown people. Where will these constituencies go? Not to the Republicans! A clear electoral alternative must be reimagined and constructed. When I accepted the two most progressive third parties’ support, I also asked the Justice Party to join with us. This is historic. These parties have rarely, if ever, united like this. I’m also reaching out to independents and the growing number of disaffected Democrats. It’s a unity not just around a candidate, but for the issues and solutions that actually close the huge gaps in our social, environmental, and economic systems. Our campaign’s taglines are “Imagine & Build,” “Dream & Deliver.”

Matt: As everyone knows our planet is in crisis. California is a major economic engine within our country which is still one of the, if not the, biggest environmental polluters in the world. What would you as Governor do to change the destructive industries and green the economy? 

Luis: We need to reset everything. From being a state that pollutes and excavates or drills for the profit of a few, to a state that is based on the shared well-being of everyone. We have great beauty and bounty in California. Massive abundance. But our governance, like our economy, is based on scarcity, competition, and maximizing profit. It’s misaligned. We are a schizophrenic society—where technology, nature, and human capacity can provide great wonders and resources, but the way we run things is based on industrial models and manufacturing relationships that arose out of a different period. Instead of the old and dying capitalist system paradigms, we should birth a new world of meeting needs and peaceful and positive resolutions to any and all problems. War and adversarial relations, which is everywhere, must be replaced with a caring society, one that recognizes and enhances everyone’s talents, propensities, passions, and gifts. We must be a society that replenishes, not takes away. That regenerates, not stagnates. As governor, I will implement a Green New Deal. Remove ourselves from fossil fuel energies and shift to clean and renewable energies. 

Matt: Tent cities are growing throughout our state as more and more people are growing houseless. Mayors, city governments and the state as a whole preach compassion and reform in words but are more apt to crack the baton in practice.

How would you as governor address the growing and looming houslessness of so many Californians as well as address the needs of those already find themselves houseless? 

Luis: The unhoused themselves have the answers. Go to the most impacted. There are leaders arising out of these encampments and shelters. The Union of the Homeless is one of the organizations that arose out of my last run for California governor in 2014. What’s the answer? Decent and affordable housing for all. Remove homes from the volatile housing markets. Yes, we should also provide mental health and drug treatment on demand. But the first thing is to get people adequately housed. Millions of abandoned homes and structures dot the landscape. This is obscene as the numbers of homeless worsen in the fifth largest economy in the world. This also involves providing jobs that are consistent and well paying. People are homeless because housing prices and rents have risen astronomically, even after millions lost their homes during the 2008 mortgage crisis. Gentrification, with big developers at the fore, has driven the poorest out of most cities. The answers are in our hands. We don’t need to criminalize the unhoused or just provide short-term solutions. Give us the “hammer and nails” and we will rebuild our communities, our cities, our state. People are homeless, they are not helpless.

Matt: All throughout the state they are closing schools and building prisons. The police are being militarized and ICE is terrorizing our communities. How would you address the questions of Police/ICE terror as governor of the state? 

Luis: We must end providing our biggest budgets to police and mass incarceration. The police and prisons are profiting from the economic misery. The prison and jail budget in California is around $18.5 billion. This has become the largest subsidized housing for poor people in the state. Crime and poverty are linked. As Charles Darwin once said, “you want to end crime, give people a chance to live.” We must do more on the front end—from cradle to crave—to align our resources to people’s needs. We cannot just be feeding the back end—more police and prisons—which respond after people have become mentally unstable, on drugs, driven into the streets, and left to their own devices. There are plans, books, blueprints, and more one how to do this, to end crime without relying on police, especially a militarized police that is armed to the teeth against our poorest residents. And, yes, we must remove ICE from our communities and workplaces; we must close down all detention centers, and provide dignity and rights to all migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers.

Matt: The recent debates about Critical Race Theory and even more recent book ban in Tennessee have brought questions about this country’s foundations and persistent myths to the forefront of political debate and discussion. The book ban today in Tennessee in many ways is reminiscent of the one that took place in Arizona in 2010. During that period several of your books found their way to be blacklisted. As a writer, you are no stranger to the question of political censorship.

These struggles and their sides are obvious. Here in California these questions get murkier. With the passage of Assembly Bill No. 101 Ethnic Studies will become a mandatory requirement for high school graduation. However the process has been anything but smooth. 

The original Assembly No. 331 was vetoed by Gavin Newsom who specifically raised objections to the curriculum, essentially demanding a new one that pleased him for its passage. This too is censorship. This too is white supremacy. 

How then do you view the ongoing struggle today here in California over the Ethnic Studies curriculum?  How as Governor how would you support Ethnic Studies and those who develop its curriculum?  

Luis: We need truth and critical thinking in our classrooms. What has been taught in our schools is largely fantasized ideals of a reality that never existed. We don’t need to pay homage to racist and class-based curriculums created mostly by white supremacists. They made Europe the center of the world, and white men of power the center of all their narratives. All human beings have contributed to human development. If you smoke cigarettes, drink coffee, love chocolate, fly a kite, write on paper, use fireworks, barbecue, etc. (considered “all-American”) you have done things created by people of color. All the world’s main religions—Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism—have origins outside of Europe. The world’s seven recognized “cradles of civilization” were outside of so-called white regions of the world (these are the Niger River and Egypt (Africa), Mesopotamia (Mideast), Indus Valley (India), Yellow River (China), Olmec/Toltec/Aztec/Mayan (from Mexico and Central America), and Inca (Peru and other Andean areas). 

Europe has contributed immense things, but let’s be full and complete in our research and re-telling. California has failed to fully expound on our story. Especially around the terrible destruction of indigenous peoples and land since Europeans first arrived here. We study the great mission systems in benign ways, removing the slavery and genocide implicit in their design. Or the terrible role the US had in Indigenous genocide, slavery, race-based social practices, and labor battles, including bounties to murder as many Native peoples as possible. We must tell the “good, bad, and the ugly.” That’s why I support Critical Race Theory and a full Ethnic Studies program in all our high schools, colleges, and universities. 

Banning of books has always been part of the white supremacist educational model. My own first memoir, “Always Running” became one of the most 100 censored books in the country, although it’s also one of the most checked out–and stolen–books in California libraries. What happened in Tennessee and in Arizona must not happen here. But then, as you say, even Governor Newsom vetoed the first Ethnic Studies legislation because it failed to please him and other gatekeepers of our history. 

We have teachers, historians, researchers, and students from all our diverse communities working together to create such curriculums. There’s no excuse for not having a comprehensive Ethnic Studies program in all our schools.

Matt: Thank you so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to answer some quick questions, Luis. We hope our readers are more informed on your positions and wish you the best in your continued campaign.

Luis: It’s been a pleasure. Thank you for having me.

Rubén Funkahuatl Guevara Discusses “Con Safos” Documentary at Re/Arte

BOYLE HEIGHTS, CA – ReArte is pleased to welcome Los Angeles native and all-around
artist, Rubén Funkahuatl Guevara, at ReArte headquarters on Saturday October 30th. He will be
joined by his son, Rubén Guevara III, who is the Co-creator and executive producer of “Con
Safos” that shares Rubén’s rise as a Chicano culture sculptor.


The documentary was released October 13th on KCET’s Artbound series and recounts how
Rubén’s life experiences and crossover in Chicano performance art shaped Chicano culture and
made people proud and understand Chicanismo.


He is considered a Chicano rock pioneer and his musical talents led him to work with other
Chicanos in the entertainment industry like Cheech Marin. “I’m brought on as a cultural
consultant and my screen credit is East L.A. Cultural Attache,” Guevara shared in the
documentary about working with Cheech for his movie, Born in East L.A. He

Hear more about Rubén’s life experiences and the making of the documentary, “Con Safos”, this
Saturday from 2-5pm with a Q&A led by L.A. poet Iván Salinas at ReArte.

Re/Arte Grand Opening Party! Sat. June 26th

Celebrate with us this Saturday, June 26th 2021, for the opening of Re/Arte, a literary space in the Boyle Heights community & the new home of Dryland Literary Journal, Hombre Lobo, & Ponte Las Pilas Press. DOORS OPEN AT 6 PM. We will have a mic set up for any poets to bless the space with their palabras.

Feel free to bring books, art prints, or supplies to donate! We are also accepting donations via Venmo @reartela. For tax-deductible donations, we are taking donations via our fiscal sponsor Tia Chucha at tiachucha.org/donate (please make sure to give us your full name when you donate via Tia Chucha to keep track of the donations made to Re/Arte)!

Re/Arte is a literary and art center run/owned by Viva Padilla. This is a space open to hosting a number of events such as film screenings, book readings, open mic nights, workshops, author talks, literacy programs for the youth, and more. Visit the website for more information on upcoming events and how to book the space for your event!

Time & Location

When: Saturday, June 26th, 2021. 6 PM – ???

Location: RE/ARTE: 2014 E. Cesar E Chavez Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90033

Dryland Literary Journal Awarded Critical Minded Grant

We are excited to announce that Dryland has been awarded a $5,000 grant from Critical Minded, a grantmaking and learning initiative of The Nathan Cummings Foundation and The Ford Foundation which aims to support critics of color in the United States. The purpose of the initiative is to “build the resources and visibility of cultural critics of color through: direct support to publications and individuals, research, advocacy, and convening.”

Historically, critics of color have been pushed out of cultural and political conversations. In the article “Why Cultural Critics of Color Matter,” Elizabeth Méndez Berry, Director of Voice, Creativity, and Culture at the Nathan Cummings Foundation, wrote: “If we have been made painfully aware of the lack of representation of people of color in the industries that tell us stories, we should also be aware of the lack of representation of people of color in the places where we make meaning of those stories…the majority of full-time critics — at the few media outlets that still have them — are white.”

Through the Critical Minded grant the editors of Dryland are using these funds to publish criticisms from writers of color that challenge narratives, aesthetics, and topics in the arts while engaging in political discourse relevant to our readers. 

We are currently accepting pitches until March 1st, 2021. Accepted pitches will be published in Issue 11. For more information head over to our submissions guidelines.